Friday, April 21, 2017

What Else is New?



FREE COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN THE U.S.

A recent report headline read: “You can now go to college for free in two of the most expensive places in the US” – referring to California (San Francisco city in particular) and New York.  Our response was, “What else is new?”  Free university and college studies have been  in the news a lot in recent years but have also been followed by one sort of problem or another.  For those thinking of relocating to take advantage of the announced free education, you should be reminded that your yearly income has to be at least $86,000 or $100,000 to live comfortably in New York or San Francisco.

Last year, a BBC report questioned whether free university tuition would work in the U.S.  The report pointed out that other countries use taxes to fund free university education  and have far fewer students than the US. For example, 2013 statistics showed that Germany had 2.7 million students in higher education and Norway had 255,000 compared to the US’s 20 million.

In response to the recent report headline above, some potential students may find it more appropriate to ask, “Wouldn’t it be better to explore free online courses or programs?”


THE PROS AND CONS OF AN ONLINE EDUCATION

Pros of an Online Education
·         Flexible schedule, as students can log onto the course material at their convenience, making it possible for them to keep up with other responsibilities;
·         Increased availability of programs, as more schools are offering online programs, increasing the available options for studies and allowing students to search until they find one that meets their needs;
·         Access to courses 24/7, as online courses are available round-the-clock to any student with a computer and Internet access, unlike on-campus courses that require students to be in class at certain times;
·         No need for relocation or travelling, as online students can study right from their homes, saving time, gas, and vehicle wear and tear. It also eliminates having to drive in inclement weather;
·         Multi-media format allows online students to learn through a variety of ways, including Web cams, CD/DVDs, animation and virtual classrooms.  This can make courses more interesting and easier to understand;
·         A wide variety of courses/programs available and students can choose to study almost any program online;
·         Students can log into their programs at their convenience and learn at their own pace; and
·         Reputation of online education compared to on-campus programs has continually improved.

Cons of an Online Education
·         Lack of social interaction among students;
·         Less student/Instructor interaction and students may have to wait for hours for a reply to questions;
·         Technology problems can interfere with students’ progress;
·         Without a teacher’s push, online students, may have low motivation and may procrastinate;
·         Transferring credits can be problematic as some schools still do not acknowledge online schools in the same light as on-campus schools; and
·         Financial aid is not available for some online schools.

MOOC vs On Campus / Carey vs Muth
In his recent book, “The End of College,” Kevin Carey explained how he had taken Prof. Eric Lander’s MOOC (see in REFERENCES below) and earned a certificate for completing the same work as that of a first year students at MIT. Carey did all the online class activities, also took the time to visit the class in real time – and came away convinced that online  courses is better because it allows him to:
·         Hit the pause button during the lecture to write notes in a more complete way than trying to write down words as they stream out in real time;
·         Concentrate on the class in a quiet place, such as the comfort of their home, instead of being distracted by the student next to him who is focused far more on their phone than what is going on in class;
·         Hear Prof.  Lander clearer; and
·         Clearly see what Prof. Lander does through multiple camera angles, instead of a far away view of him from the back of a lecture hall.

Carey showed that this particular MOOC class teaches students the material in ways that are even better than if the students were on campus taking the class in person. In addition, Carey also underscores how the new technology, combined with the discoveries in the fields of neuroscience and education science about learning, can help to individualize the experience of taking MOOCs.

Carey tries to convince his readers that colleges and universities will be falling by the hundreds (or even thousands) in the next several decades.  Some research results seem to support Carey’s prediction. According to a 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning says there has been a 21% growth rate in online enrollment, compared to a 2% growth with higher education student population overall. However, Parke Muth points out that Carey has left out at least 5 things that will undercut any relatively fast transformation of the education landscape:

·         Despite what research data shows, many people still believe that on campus experiences make for a much deeper and fuller preparation for what will happen after graduation;
·         The schools will fight off their competitors and will not just wait around while being overtaken by MOOCs;
·         Some course activities are difficult to accomplish online, e.g. conducting labs, and other hands-on activities;
·         In the U.S., testing companies (e.g., Educational Testing Service (ETS)) also have a vested interest in trying to keep things as is and will fight off completion by MOOCs; and
·         Security is still a big challenge as it is still difficult to totally control online cheating.

Conclusion
·         First it should be noted that cheating also occurs in on-campus classes and improved technology will make it more difficult to cheat; and
·         The rate at which online/MOOC classes expand in comparison to on-campus classes can be debated. However, it seems obvious that we cannot deny the fact that online/MOOC classes will become more recognized and play a key role in future U.S. and international education.


WHAT NEXT?
·         Check out a free or low cost online/ MOOC course or program that could start the ball rolling for you;
·         For the U.S., the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) allows students to find/ filter programs based on distance learning options, education fields and geographic location.  To check them out, please click here;
·         To explore free online courses available from the “Open Education Consortium,” a worldwide community of 280+ higher education institutions and associated organizations, please click here.


REFERENCES

FREE COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN THE U.S.
·         http://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/12/college-is-free-now-in-two-of-the-most-expensive-places-in-america.html
·         http://www.bbc.com/news/business-36751075

THE PROS AND CONS OF AN ONLINE EDUCATION
·         http://www.topeducationdegrees.org/faq/what-are-the-pros-and-cons-of-an-online-education/
·         https://www.quora.com/Are-MOOCs-destroying-education



Posted by Dr. Nat Tuivavalagi 

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Why you should be checking out free online courses on cloud computing?




What is cloud computing?
·         If you use an online service to send email, edit documents, watch movies or TV, listen to music, play games, or store pictures and other files, it’s likely that cloud computing is making it all possible behind the scenes. Simply put, cloud computing is the delivery of computing services—servers, storage, databases, networking, software, analytics, and more—over the Internet (“the cloud”). Companies offering these computing services are called cloud providers. They typically charge for cloud computing services based on usage, similar to how you’re billed for water or electricity at home.
·         Below are a few  things you can do with the cloud:
o   Create new apps and services;
o   Store, backup, and recover data;
o   Host websites and blogs;
o   Stream audio and video;
o   Deliver software on demand;
o   Analyze data for patterns and make predictions.
·         Top benefits of cloud computing include:
o   1) lower cost –  as it is cheaper and more convenient to pay monthly electricity bills than making your own electricity,
o   2) greater speed,
o   3) global scale – system is flexible and can deliver the right amount of computing power needed,
o   4)  high productivity,
o   5) high performance, and 
o   6) reliability – robust data backup.

HOW THE CLOUD HAS CHANGED THE CLASSROOM:
·         With cloud computing, collaboration between students and teacher can happen from anywhere from any device - tablet, laptop, or phone;
·         Teachers are no longer going home with a bag-full of papers to mark;
·         Via the cloud, and with no need for USB flash drives, students can easily share their essays with their peers and teachers. The peers and teachers may then provide comments so the students may  make the necessary changes;
·         Teachers are more fluent in their curriculum design. E.g., a teacher might see a great example from first period, snap a picture of it and upload it into his/her presentation for  the second period's benefit. 
·         Students can create their own TED Talk and upload it onto the cloud where the teacher can access and assess it;
·         Students who were sick or unable to attend class don’t miss out because they have immediate access to what was done that day. The cloud keeps them up to speed with their classmates;
·         Parents can see grades, check to ensure that all assigned homework has been completed, and nudge their child along if a piece is missing; and
·         Educators outside of urban and private school environments have equal access to world-class, global educational sites and teaching environments.

HOW THE CLOUD WILL CHANGE OTHER ASPECTS OF OUR LIVES
Joe Mullich, came up with 16 major ways in which the Cloud will change our lives after interviewing numerous experts in the various fields of cloud computing. Nine of them are as follows:

1)      Everyone will become a gamer:
Gaming is called the “killer app” of cloud computing, and the same gaming principles are now being extended to many other areas. E.g., the new generation of wellness and chronic disease management programs use gaming techniques to educate and coach patients in real time.

2)      Repairing objects will be easier:
You can expect to get earlier notification when things around your house or office are about to go on the fritz. E.g., a cloud-based app alerts drivers of electric cars when their batteries will run out of juice.

3)      Computers will become invisible:
You will be able to walk into a room where there may be hundreds of sensors that could respond to your gestures and movements.

4)      You’ll be able to make smarter decisions:
The cloud can turn any mobile device into a “supercomputer” meaning you can access processing power as needed from the cloud to analyze virtually any type of information wherever you are.

5)      Laptop security breaches will decline:
The cloud can eliminate concerns of security breaches by having all data securely stored on the Internet. The laptop no longer stores the data; rather, it simply becomes the instrument by which to access it.

6)      Public/private clouds will make homes healthier:
E.g., the cloud allows doctors to wirelessly monitor patients with sleep apnea, collect information and then tap into a network of experts to devise a treatment plan.

7)      Developing countries will become new markets and new competitors:
Developing countries can embrace the cloud quicker and exploit new opportunities faster, since they won’t be as delayed by tasks like integrating legacy technology.  The cloud will also provide new opportunities in these emerging countries as mobile devices will become the outlet to open up huge new markets.

8)      Everyone will bootstrap:
The cloud offers individuals exciting ways to collaborate, develop products and test ideas rapidly and cheaply, which could accelerate the rising rate of entrepreneurialism. “You see small startups using the cloud to do complex modeling of new product offers,” Hagel says. “The speed at which you can identify what people are interested in, and what they will pay, really changes the nature of innovation.”

9)      Language barriers will fade: 
Today, cloud computing already gives mobile-device users a level of speech recognition accuracy that is virtually on par with call center-based transcription services.  In the future, your mobile device will enable you to communicate with someone who speaks a different language. The words that are exchanged  are instantly translated into each other’s languages using voice recognition and translation software.

INVESTMENT & CONCLUSION
·         Major cloud technology companies invest billions of dollars per year in cloud Research and Development. For example, in 2011 Microsoft committed 90 percent of its $9.6 billion R&D budget to its cloud.  Research by investment bank Centaur Partners in late 2015 forecasted that SaaS (cloud computing) revenue would grow from $13.5 billion in 2011 to $32.8 billion in 2016.
·         Cloud computing has come of age.  The business and commercial opportunities are enormous and many companies are already enjoying significant business benefits.

FREE ONLINE COURSES ON CLOUD COMPUTING
The number and quality of free online cloud computing courses have continued to grow.  You can find some of them via the links below:

ALISON: https://alison.com > Courses > Digital Literacy & IT Skills

Cloud Academy Library: https://cloudacademy.com/courses/







REFERENCES:

WHAT IS CLOUD COMPUTING?

HOW THE CLOUD HAS CHANGED THE CLASSROOM:

HOW THE CLOUD WILL CHANGE OTHER ASPECTS OF OUR LIVES

INVESTMENT & CONCLUSION

FREE ONLINE COURSES ON CLOUD COMPUTING





Posted by Dr. Nat Tuivavalagi 

Friday, March 31, 2017

The Open Education Consortium: Free courses in 30,000+ modules from 280+ institutions in 40+ countries in English & 28 other languages




HISTORY
The OpenCourseWare movement started with the University of Tübingen in Germany in 1999. However, in 2001 MIT OpenCourseWare blossomed in the U.S. This program inspired the birthing of the Open Education Consortium through which 280+ universities and other institutions have made their course materials available as open educational resources.The program was  based on a  large-scale, web-based publication of MIT course materials.

The Open Education Consortium
The Open Education Consortium (OEC), with it's headquarters in Massachusetts, USA, is a globally based network of educational institutions. Where individuals and organizations support an approach to education based on openness, collaboration, innovation and collective development and the use of open educational materials. The Open Education Consortium is a non-profit, social benefit organization registered in the United States and operating worldwide.

Mary Lou Forward is the Executive Director of the Open Education Consortium, providing leadership for the organization’s efforts to advance open education by improving higher education and people’s access to these types of programs.  

Mission & Vision
The Open Education Consortium:
·         Is a worldwide community of 280+ higher education institutions and associated organizations committed to advancing open education and its impact on global education;
·         Envisions a world where everyone, everywhere, has access to the education they need to build their futures;
·         Seeks to instill openness as a feature of education around the world. Allowing expanded access to education while providing a shared body of knowledge upon which innovative and effective approaches to today’s social problems can be built;
·         Serves as a resource for starting and sustaining open education projects, as a coordinating body for the movement on a global scale, and as a forum for exchange of ideas and future planning; and
·         Aims at bringing about change by leveraging its sources of expert opinion, its global network and its position as the principal voice of open education.

Open Education Consortium Honored
The Homeschool Base program is the largest volunteer-driven resource and news website for homeschoolers. This program has named the Open Education Consortium as one of the Top 10 Open Course Education Websites of 2017.  The award is recommended by teachers, home educators, and homeschool parents; and honors exemplary websites/apps that offer quality, innovative, unique, cost-effective, or significant value to teachers, educators, and homeschooling families. 

What is Open Education?
Open education encompasses resources, tools,and practices that employ a framework of open sharing, to improve educational access and effectiveness worldwide.

The key is to be open ; being open does not just allow access, but allows the ability to modify and use materials, information, and networks so education can be personalized to individual users or woven together in new ways for large and diverse audiences.

Why is Open Education important?
People want to learn. By providing free and open access to education and knowledge, people can fulfill their desire:
·         Students can get additional information, viewpoints and materials to help them succeed.
·         Workers can learn a new skill that will help them on the job.
·         Faculty can exchange materials and access resources from around the world.
·         Researchers can share data and develop new networks.
·         Teachers can find new ways to help students learn.
·         People can connect with others they wouldn’t otherwise meet to share information and ideas.
·         Materials can be translated, mixed together, broken apart and openly shared again, increasing access and allowing new approaches.
·         Anyone can access educational materials, scholarly articles, and supportive learning communities anytime they want to.
·         Education is available, accessible, modifiable and free.

Open Education Consortium Sponsors

Activities of the Open Education Consortium are generously supported by:
·         The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Sustaining Members of the Open Education Consortium:

The African Virtual University
Open Universiteit
Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources
Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie
Delft University of Technology
Taiwan Open Course Consortium
Fundação Getulio Vargas – FGV Online
Tecnológico de Monterrey
Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium
Tufts University
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Universia
Korea OpenCourseWare Consortium
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
University of California, Irvine
Netease Open Courses
University of Michigan

And Contributions of Member Organizations
·         280+ organizations in 40+ countries


OPEN EDUCATION CONSORTIUM RESOURCES
The “Resources” page of the Open Education Consortium website (address given below) has four sections: Open Education Information Center; CCCOER Webinars; Courses in STEM; and Open Textbooks:


  • OPEN EDUCATION INFORMATION CENTER
This initiative strives to provide information on all aspects of open education in one place. Information is organized to address needs of different audiences, such as: groups , faculty, students, administrators, researchers, and policy makers.  Visitors/ members of the audience may contribute to an on-going discussion or initiate a new one.


  •  CCCOER WEBINARS
The popular Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) webinars, feature leaders and practitioners in an open education environment. The equivalence of this opened education of that to community college faculty, students, and staff. Recent webinar topics include: Finding Open Textbooks and Fostering Faculty Adoptions; A Primer on Open Licenses and Intellectual Property; OER Impact Research Faculty and Student Voices; Open Textbook Publishing and Adoptions; California Community Colleges Share It Forward with CC-BY; Fostering Open Policies on Your Campus and Beyond; OER and Open Textbook Adoption and Sustainability; and, Libraries Lead the Way: Open Courses, OER, and Open Policy.


  • COURSES IN STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
o   Great Courses and Teachers in STEM
o   Featured Courses by Great Teachers


  • OPEN TEXTBOOKS
Audience/visitors may view open textbooks under the following subject areas:

Anthropology & Archaeology
Engineering & Electronics
Music
Art
English & Composition
Philosophy
Biology & Genetics
Health & Nursing
Physics
Business
History
Political Science
Chemistry
Languages & Communications
Psychology
Computer Science
Literature
Science
Economics
Law
Sociology
Education
Math
Statistics & Probability


OPEN EDUCATION CONSORTIUM COURSES - BY MAJOR CATEGORIES (& NO. OF SUB-CATEGORIES)

Arts & Design (with 5 sub-categories)
Language & Culture (2 – English (1); Others (11))
Business & Management (16)
Math & Logic (4)
Computer Science (16)
Personal Development (14)
Education & Training (2)
Science (10)
Engineering (3)
Social Sciences (5)
Health & Medicine (5)
Sports & Leisure (6)
Humanities (4)



ARE OPEN EDUCATION CONSORTIUM COURSES FREE?
Yes, Open Education Consortium online courses can be audited for free by anyone with an internet connection. However, if students want to receive a verified certificate, they have to pay a fee.  For example, for the 13-week MIT course “Supply Chain Design” that could be accessed via the Open Education Consortium may require a fee of $150 for a verified certificate. This is an advanced level Engineering course with videos and transcripts in English and  it requires 8-12 hrs/wk of studies.

WHAT NEXT?
For more information, please kindly check out the Open Education Consortium website via the link given below.  However, to start exploring the courses offered via the Consortium, please click here.

Open Education Consortium website: http://www.oeconsortium.org/   


Posted by: Dr. Nat Tuivavalagi



Wednesday, March 22, 2017

The MIT OpenCourseWare: A free, popular, web-based publication of 2,389 MIT courses, getting over 2 million visits a month




WHAT IS THE MIT OPENCOURSEWARE?

The MIT OpenCourseWare (MIT OCW) is an initiative from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This program was announced on April 4, 2001. The program allows all of the educational materials from its undergraduate – and graduate-level courses to be put online, openly available to anyone, anywhere. As such, the MIT OpenCourseWare is actually a large-scale, web-based publication of MIT course materials.

You don't have to register for anything; you just go to the site and access the materials. There is no supervision.. You can explore whatever you want to learn whenever you want to learn it.  The initiative has inspired more than 250 other institutions to make their course materials available as open educational resources through the Open Education Consortium.

ARE THE COURSES REALLY FREE?
The MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of  all of MIT's undergraduate and graduate courses available on the Web, free of charge, to any user in the world. MIT OCW receives an average of over 2 million web site visits per month from more than 215 countries and territories worldwide. To date, more than 220 million visitors have accessed the free MIT educational materials on the site or in translation.  Courses at the MIT OpenCourseWare are available freely in line with the MIT mission.

MIT MISSION
The mission of MIT is to advance students knowledge and educate students in courses such as: science, technology, and other areas of studies that will best serve the nation and the world in the twenty-first century. MIT seek to develop  each  member  of the MIT community the ability and passion to work wisely, creatively, and effectively for the betterment of humankind.

MIT OPENCOURSEWARE - SOME MILESTONES
·         March 7, 2017:  MIT OCW welcomes over 220 million visitors; 
·         July 23, 2012:  MIT OpenCourseWare selected one of best free reference web sites for 2012 by American Library Association;
·         February 29, 2012:  MIT OpenCourseWare teams up with Flat World Knowledge to combine free texts and free course materials; 
·         August 25, 2010:  TIME Magazine selects MIT OpenCourseWare as one of the 50 best websites of 2010;
·         July 29, 2010: MIT OpenCourseWare was named by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) as a recipient of the Science Prize for Online Resources in Education (SPORE) for promoting exceptional online materials that are available free of charge to science educators;
·         December 3, 2008: OCW welcomes 50 million visitors;
·         2007: Virtually the entire MIT curriculum published online;
·         June 18, 2004: MIT received honors from three magazines, and several others in the MIT community were recognized for individual achievements, including physics professor, Walter Lewin, and math professor, Gilbert Strang who have course materials on MIT OCW and who have individually received more than 1 million visits;
·         2002: First MIT OCW site established with 50 courses on it;
·         2000: MIT proposed the OpenCourseWare;
·         1999: MIT considered how to use the internet to fulfill their mission.

FUNDING
MIT OCW was originally funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and MIT. Currently, MIT OCW is supported by MIT, corporate underwriting, major gifts, and donations from site visitors.  As of 2013, the annual cost of running MIT OCW was about $3.5 million. MIT's goal for the next decade is to increase their reach ten-fold and to secure funding for the expansion.

Site Statistics
MIT OCW is accessed by a broadly international population of educators and learners. MIT OpenCourseWare receives over 2 million visits each month. These visits come from all over the world, with more than half coming from countries outside of North America:

MIT OPENCOUSEWARE – TYPES OF AUDIENCES / VISITORS
Educators  17%
Students  30%
Independent Learners  50%

Audiences Use MIT OPENCOURSEWARE RESOURCES FOR WHAT PURPOSE?

Educators use resources …
To improve personal knowledge 31%
To find reference material for their students 15%
To learn new teaching methods 23%
To develop curriculum for their dept./school 8%
To incorporate OCW materials into a course 20%
Other 3%

Students use resources …
To enhance personal knowledge 46%
To plan a course of study 16%
To complement a current course 34%
Other 4%

Self-Learners use resources …
To explore areas outside professional field 40%
To keep current with devpts. In their field 17%
To review basic concepts in prof. field 18%
To complete a work-related project or task 4%
To prepare for future course of study 18%
Other 3%

MIT OPENCOURSEWARE - ONLINE TRAFFIC / SITE VISITS
Site Traffic Measure
Total
February, 2017
Total Visits
229,807,626
1,921,836
Total unique visitors
145,543,926
1,280,513
MIT.EDU Visits
2,758,688
21,461
Highlights for High School Visits
5,080,616
34,379
OCW Scholar Visits
19,340,725
243,699
Page Views
1,271,109,315
7,720,709
ZIP Downloads
25,930,070
130,006

FEATURED SITES AT MIT OCW WEBSITE
Highlights for High School
MIT+K12 Videos
OCW Educator
Teaching Excellence at MIT
MIT Crosslinks and OCW
Outreach@MIT
MITx and Related OCW Courses
Open Education Consortium

COURSES

As of February 2017, over 2,380 courses are available online. While a few of these were limited to chronological reading lists and discussion topics, a majority provided homework problems and exams (often with solutions) and lecture notes. Some courses also included interactive web demonstrations in Java, complete textbooks written by MIT professors, and streaming video lectures.

As of February 2017, 92 courses included complete video lectures. The videos were available in streaming mode, but could also be downloaded for viewing offline. All video and audio files were also available thru iTunes U and the Internet Archives.

COURSES: TOPICS (11) & SUB-TOPICS (117)
Business (17 sub-topics)
Mathematics (11 sub-topics)
Energy (11 sub-topics)
Science (5 sub-topics)
Engineering (13 sub-topics)
Social Science (12 sub-topics)
Fine Arts (7 sub-topics)
Society (10 sub-topics)
Health and Medicine (21 sub-topics)
Teaching and Education (4 sub-topics)
Humanities (6 sub-topics)
---

MIT DEPARTMENTS OFFERING Audio/Video Lectures VIA MIT OPENCOURSEWARE
Aeronautics and Astronautics
Global Studies and Languages
 Anthropology
 Health Sciences and Technology
 Architecture
 History
 Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation
 Linguistics and Philosophy
 Biological Engineering
 Literature
 Biology
 Materials Science and Engineering
 Brain and Cognitive Sciences
 Mathematics
 Chemical Engineering
 Mechanical Engineering
 Chemistry
 Media Arts and Sciences
 Civil and Environmental Engineering
 Music and Theater Arts
 Comparative Media Studies
 Nuclear Science and Engineering
 Comparative Media Studies/Writing
 Physics
 Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
 Science, Technology, and Society
 Economics
 Sloan School of Management
 Edgerton Center (Energy)
 Supplemental Resources
 Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
 Urban Studies and Planning
 Engineering Systems Division
 Writing and Humanistic Studies
 Experimental Study Group


HOW TO FIND COURSES AT THE MIT OPENCOURSEWARE WEBSITE
Find by Topic
New Courses
Find by Course Number
Most Visited Courses
Find by Department
OCW Scholar Courses
Instructional Approach
This Course at MIT
Teaching Materials
Supplemental Resources
Audio/Video Courses
Translated Courses
Courses with Subtitles
View All Courses
Online Textbooks


WHAT NEXT?
As mentioned, courses at the MIT OpenCourseWare are available at no cost.  To find out more about this opportunity or to explore the available courses and identify one that you might want to try out, please click here.


Posted by Dr. Nat Tuivavalagi